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Jump to:
Triangle | Pentagon | Hexagon | Octagon

Other Granny Shapes
© 2003, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com

So, you’ve made a granny square. That’s great! But did you know that you can use the same techniques to make lots of other shapes, too?

Granny squares use four shells on the first round to make the four corners. The pentagon uses five shells on the first round to make five corners. You'd think you could just move on and use six shells for a hexagon and eight for an octagon, right? Well, it doesn't work as well as you go higher up in number. What happens is that there are too many stitches on each side and it won't stay flat. So what do we do? We have to have fewer stitches on each side, but still have the right number of sides. Well, one way to do this would be to use ch-1 instead of ch-3 in your corners. Another way would be to use fewer stitches in each shell. Still another way would be to start with a smaller number and add corners to each round to make the proper number. Don't be afraid to change the pattern to suit your needs.

If you use a foundation chain joined into a ring, you may need to adjust your foundation chain to accommodate fewer or more shells, depending on which shape you are working. Note that the more chains in your foundation chain, the larger your center hole will be.

Just for fun, here's a list of shape names and number of sides in each so you can show off to your friends. Each will require a different method of "creation".

Triangle - 3 sides
Square - 4 sides 
Pentagon - 5 sides
Hexagon - 6 sides
Heptagon - 7 sides
Octagon - 8 sides
Nonagon - 9 sides
Decagon - 10 sides
Undecagon - 11 sides
Dodecagon - 12 sides

Note: A one-round granny square is called a Granny's Daughter. A two-round granny square is called a Saltine.

Here are some of the more commonly used shapes and how to make them.

 

The Triangle
© 2009, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com

The triangle granny can be particularly useful, as it is a half-square.  When arranging granny squares on an angle, triangle grannies can be used to fill in the gaps and allow for straight sides.

Here’s the video demonstration.
 

 

 

 


Materials
A small amount of 4 ply worsted weight yarn, H hook (or whatever gets you the size you want), large eye needle for sewing in ends (or just use your hook).

Abbreviations
beg = beginning
ch = chain
dc = double crochet
ea = each
hk = hook
rep = repeat
shell = 3 double crochets
sl st = slip stitch
sp = space
wk = work
YO = yarn over

A shell is a group of double crochets worked into the same space or stitch. (Note: if you find your shape seems to have too many stitches per round - it won't lie flat - then replace the 3-dc shell with a 2 dc shell, which will give you less stitches overall.)

Instructions (4 dc = 1 shell)
Make an adjustable ring.

Round 1
ch 3, 3 dc in ring, ch 3,  (4dc in ring, ch 3) twice (total of 3 shell groups), join with a sl st to top st of beg ch-3

Round 2
Sl st in ea of next 3 dc, sl st in ch-3 sp, then in same sp wk (ch 3, 3 dc, ch 3, shell) (first corner),
ch 1, in next ch-3 sp wk (shell, ch 3, shell) (2nd corner),
ch 1, in next ch-3 sp wk (shell, ch3, shell) (3rd corner),
ch 1, join with sl st to top of beg ch-3.

Round 3
sl st in ea of next 3 dc, sl st in ch-3 sp, ch3, 3dc, ch3, shell in same sp (1st corner made),
ch 1, shell in ch-1 sp between groups to form first side, ch 1, in next corner ch-3 sp work (shell, ch 3, shell), (2nd corner)
ch 1, shell in ch-1 sp between groups to form second side, ch 1, in next corner ch-3 sp work (shell, ch 3, shell), (3rd corner)
ch 1, shell in ch-1 sp between groups to form third side, ch 1, join with sl st to top of ch-3. Finish off.

Here is another version of the triangle, using 3-dc shells:

Instructions (3 dc = 1 shell)
ch 4, join with a sl st to form a ring.

Round 1
ch 3, 2 dc in ring, ch 3,  (3dc in ring, ch 3) twice (total of 3 shell groups), join with a sl st to top st of beg ch-3

Round 2
Sl st in ea of next 2 dc, sl st in ch-3 sp, then in same sp wk (ch 3, 2 dc, ch 3, shell) (first corner),
ch 1, in next ch-3 sp wk (shell, ch 3, shell) (2nd corner),
ch 1, in next ch-3 sp wk (shell, ch3, shell) (3rd corner),
ch 1, join with sl st to top of beg ch-3.

Round 3
sl st in ea of next 2 dc, sl st in ch-3 sp, ch3, 2dc, ch3, shell in same sp (1st corner made),
ch 1, shell in ch-1 sp between groups to form first side, ch 1, in next corner ch-3 sp work (shell, ch 3, shell), (2nd corner)
ch 1, shell in ch-1 sp between groups to form second side, ch 1, in next corner ch-3 sp work (shell, ch 3, shell), (3rd corner)
ch 1, shell in ch-1 sp between groups to form third side, ch 1, join with sl st to top of ch-3. Finish off.

You might find a slight "bulge" in the center. There are a couple ways to fix this. One is to lengthen your stitches using the Golden Loop (see Crochet Dictionary). Another is to use ch 4 or 5 in the corners rather than ch 3. You may have to play with it, depending on your personal tension.

 

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The Pentagon
© 2009, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com

A pentagon is a basic shape with five sides and five corners. The basic shapes - pentagon, granny, hexagon etc. - are not copyrighted by anyone. Patterns designed using these shapes are copyrighted though it is quite conceivable that more than one person comes up with a similar design. This tutorial is copyrighted by me but someone else can decide to do a tutorial on how to make the pentagon. They just can't use MY tutorial, without my permission.

Here’s the video demonstration.
 

 


Materials
A small amount of 4 ply worsted weight yarn, I hook, large eye needle for sewing in ends (or just use your hook).

Abbreviations
beg = beginning
ch = chain
dc = double crochet
ea = each
hk = hook
rep = repeat
shell = 3 double crochets
sl st = slip stitch
sp = space
wk = work
YO = yarn over

A shell is a group of double crochets worked into the same space or stitch. In this case 3 dc = shell.

Instructions
Make a ring using either the adjustable ring or chain 5 and join with a slip stitch.

Round 1
Chain 2 or 3 depending on what you like to do to start a double crochet. (I usually use ch-2 and will use it here). This brings your round up to the correct height. Whichever you decide to use, be sure you do it the same way throughout your square.  The ch-2 counts as the first dc of that shell.

Yo, insert your hook in the center hole  (the hole will get bigger as you go) and complete a double crochet. Make one more double crochet. This is your first shell grouping.

REMEMBER - all this time you are inserting hook into that center hole. You may have to push the stitches to the side so they all fit.

Chain 3, work 3 double crochets in that center hole. This is your second shell grouping.

Chain 3, work 3 more double crochets. This is your third shell grouping.

Chain 3, work 3 double crochets. This is your fourth shell grouping.

Chain 3 once more and work 3 double crochets. This is your fifth shell grouping.
Finally, you will make another chain 3.

You should have 5 shells, or groups of 3 double crochets separated by 3 chains. These are the 5 corners.

Join your last chain 3 to the top chain of the next shell grouping as shown in Figures 7 and 8. End Round 1.

Round 2
Note: If you find that your pentagon won't stay flat, there are a few ways to remedy this. You can use fewer chains in the corners or even fewer stitches. For example, you could use (2 dc, ch2, 2 dc) in corners. Just figure out what works best before you do a dozen of them. It's fine for your first round to have 3 dc shells and the remaining rounds to have fewer.

Slip stitch in each dc and the corner ch-3 space, inserting your hook into the space, chain 2 to bring up to height. Then make 2 double crochets, inserting the hook right in that same space or hole, underneath the chain-3 from the previous round. Chain 3, then make 3 more double crochets. This is your FIRST CORNER.

Chain 1. This is your "in between" stitch. It's in-between your corners on this round. Then insert hook under the ch-3 from the previous row and work (3dc, ch3, 3dc). This is your SECOND CORNER.

Chain 1. In the next ch-3 space, work another corner (Shell, ch 3, Shell). This is your THIRD CORNER.

Chain 1. In next ch-3 space, work another corner. This is your FOURTH CORNER.

Chain 1. In next ch-3 space, work another corner. This is your FIFTH CORNER.

Chain 1. Make a slip stitch by inserting hook into the top chain of your beginning chain-3, YO and pull yarn through the chain and the loop on hook.  You have 10 shells on this round.

Round 3
(Ch 2, 2 dc, ch 3, shell --remember, that's 3dc) There's your first corner for Round 3 and it's almost in real "crochet talk.”

Chain 1, shell in next space (which is the chain-1 space from previous round), chain 1 again. There's your first SIDE.

Then in next space (which is a corner ch-3 space) work (shell, ch3, shell) for your second corner of Round 3.

Chain 1, shell in ch-1 sp between groups to form second side, ch 1, in next corner ch-3 sp work (shell, ch 3, shell) (third corner).

Chain 1, shell in ch-1 sp between groups to form third side, ch 1, in next corner ch-3 sp work (shell, ch 3, shell) (fourth corner).

Chain 1, shell in ch-1 sp between groups to form fourth side, ch 1, in next corner ch-3 sp work (shell, ch 3, shell) (fifth corner).

Chain 1, shell in ch-1 sp between groups to form fifth side, ch 1, join with sl st to top of ch-3. Finish off.

Your last round should have 15 shells. (And if you do more rounds each one will add 5 more shells to the total.)

 

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The Hexagon
© 2003, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com

A hexagon is a six-sided figure. This tutorial will show you how to crochet one which is worked in rounds, on one side only. You can use the hexagon (or any other shape) in afghans and different projects. You just have to be creative in how you join them. Depending on hook and tension, you might find your hexagon won't lie flat. It is sometimes helpful to use fewer stitches per side or adjust the height of your stitches.

Here’s the video demonstration.
 

 


Materials

A small amount of 4 ply worsted weight yarn, I hook, large eye needle for sewing in ends.

Abbreviations
beg = beginning
ch = chain
dc = double crochet
ea = each
hk = hook
rep = repeat
shell = 3 double crochets
sl st = slip stitch
sp = space
wk = work
YO = yarn over

Note: A shell is a group of double crochets worked into the same space or stitch. For purposes of this tutorial, a shell is 2 dc. In some other applications, I use a 3dc shell. The 3dc shell would also work fine for a small hexagon of three or four rounds, then it starts to fold and bunch up. However, using 2dc shells, I was able to get 10 rounds to lie flat. That's as far as I went so I don't know if it would have continued to lie flat with succeeding rounds.

Instructions
Make an adjustable ring, or ch 6 and join with a sl st to form a ring.

Note: you can ch-2 or ch-3 to bring up to height, whichever works best for you.


Round 1

Ch 2, dc in ring, (ch 2,  2dc in ring) five times (6 shell groups), join with a sc or hdc to top st of beg ch-2

Option: You can join each round by slip stitching into the top of the beginning ch-2 and slip stitch in the next dc, and in the next chain space to start in the corner if you prefer. This method is demonstrated in the video on rounds 2 and 3. Be sure you end up with 6 corners on each round.

Round 2
Ch 2 for height, in same sp wk (1 dc, ch 2, shell) (first corner), ch 1
in next ch-2 sp wk (shell, ch 2, shell) (2nd corner), ch 1
in next ch-2 sp wk (shell, ch 2, shell) (3rd corner), ch 1
in next ch-2 sp wk (shell, ch 2, shell) (4th corner), ch 1
in next ch-2 sp wk (shell, ch 2, shell) (5th corner), ch 1
in next ch-2 sp wk (shell, ch 2, shell) (6th corner), ch 1
join with sc to top of beg ch-2.

Round 3
In same sp wk (ch 2, dcl) for first side
in next corner ch-2 sp work (shell, ch 2, shell), (1st corner made)
ch 1, shell in next ch-1 sp to form second side, in next corner ch-2 sp work (shell, ch 2, shell), (2nd corner)
ch 1, shell in next ch-1 sp to form third side, in next corner ch-2 sp work (shell, ch 2, shell), (3rd corner)
ch 1, shell in next ch-1 sp to form fourth side, in next corner ch-2 sp work (shell, ch 2, shell), (4th corner)
ch 1, shell in next ch-1 sp to form fifth side, in next corner ch-2 sp work (shell, ch 2, shell), (5th corner)
ch 1, shell in next ch-1 sp to form sixth side, in next corner ch-2 sp work (shell, ch 2, shell), (6th corner)
ch 1, join with sc to top of ch-2.

The video stops at Round 3 but you can continue making additional rounds by following the same procedure.

Round 4
Ch2, 2dc in same sp, ch 1, shell in next ch-1 sp (first  side),
ch 1, (shell, ch 2, shell) in ch-2 sp (first corner)
ch 1, shell in ch-1 sp, ch 1, shell in next ch-1 sp (second side),
ch 1, in next corner ch-2 sp work (shell, ch 2, shell), (2nd corner)
ch 1, shell in ch-1 sp, ch 1, shell in next ch-1 sp (third side),
ch 1, in next corner ch-2 sp work (shell, ch 2, shell), (3rd corner)
ch 1, shell in ch-1 sp, ch 1, shell in next ch-1 sp (fourth side)
ch 1, in next corner ch-2 sp work (shell, ch 2, shell), (4th corner)
ch 1, shell in ch-1 sp, ch 1, shell in next ch-1 sp (fourth side)
ch 1, in next corner ch-2 sp work (shell, ch 2, shell), (5th corner)
ch 1, shell in ch-1 sp, ch 1, shell in next ch-1 sp (fourth side)
ch 1, in next corner ch-2 sp work (shell, ch 2, shell), (6th corner)
join with sc in top ch of beg ch-2. 

This procedure written as an actual pattern would be shorter because the repeats would be noted as such. For example, rather than spell out every corner and side, it would be abbreviated as below.

* ch 1, shell in ch-1 sp, ch 1, shell in next ch-1 sp for side, ch 1, in next corner ch-2 sp work (shell, ch 2, shell) for corner, rep from * four times

OR it might be written:

[ch 1, shell in ch-1 sp, ch 1, shell in next ch-1 sp for side, ch 1, in next corner ch-2 sp work (shell, ch 2, shell) for corner] five times

When you say "repeat" that means you've already done it once, so the number of repeats is smaller than if you say "do this so many times".

Some might even cut it shorter by putting (corner) in place of every (shell, ch 2, shell). If they do this, they will define "corner" in the special stitches at the beginning of the pattern, or the first time it is used within the pattern.

Here is a hexagon worked with 3 dc shells (and three colors) which won't lie flat.
 


One way to cure that problem is to adjust the length of your stitches. Here is the same pattern (3 dc shells) but worked with a longer dc. To make your dc longer you just pull your loop up a bit higher when you're working. This is called the Golden Loop. When you insert your hook into a stitch, you yarn over and pull through. When you pull through, that loop is called the Golden Loop. If you concentrate, you can extend in to make your stitch higher. The important thing though is that you must continue this in a regular manner throughout your piece. Once you get the hang of it it's really not difficult.
 

 

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The Octagon
© 2003, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com

The octagon has eight sides and is a popular motif which is easy to fit together.

Materials
A small amount of 4 ply worsted weight yarn, H hook (or whatever gets you the size you want), large eye needle for sewing in ends (or just use your hook).

Abbreviations
beg = beginning
ch = chain
dc = double crochet
ea = each
hk = hook
rep = repeat
shell = 3 double crochets
sl st = slip stitch
sp = space
wk = work
YO = yarn over

A shell is a group of double crochets worked into the same space or stitch. This octagon uses 3-dc shells on the first round, and 2-dc shells on the succeeding rounds. If you want all your rounds to be the same, just use 2-dc shells on the first round as well.

Instructions
ch 6 (can go to 7 or 8 if you need to), join with a slip stitch to make a ring

Round 1
ch 3, 2 dc in ring, ch 3, (3dc in ring, ch 3) 7 times (8 shell groups), join with a sl st to top st of beg ch-3

Round 2
Sl st in ea of next 2 dc, sl st in ch-3 sp, then in same sp wk (ch 2, dc, ch 1, 2dc) (first corner),
ch 1, in next sp wk (2dc, ch 1, 2dc) (2nd corner)
ch 1, in next sp wk (2dc, ch 1, 2dc) (3rd corner)
ch 1, in next sp wk (2dc, ch 1, 2dc) (4th corner)
ch 1, in next sp wk (2dc, ch 1, 2dc) (5th corner)
ch 1, in next sp wk (2dc, ch 1, 2dc) (6th corner)
ch 1, in next sp wk (2dc, ch 1, 2dc) (7th corner)
ch 1, in next sp wk (2dc, ch 1, 2dc) (8th corner)
ch 1, join with sl st to top of beg ch-3.

If you find this is not lying flat, eliminate the ch-1 between shells along sides but keep the one in corners

Round 3
sl st in next dc, sl st in ch-1 sp, ch2, dc, ch1, 2dc in same sp (1st corner made),
ch 1, 2dc in sp between groups to form first side, ch 1, in next corner sp work (2dc, ch 1, 2dc), (2nd corner)
ch 1, 2dc in sp between groups to form second side, ch 1, in next corner sp work (2dc, ch 1, 2dc), (3rd corner)
ch 1, 2dc in sp between groups to form third side, ch 1, in next corner sp work (2dc, ch 1, 2dc), (4th corner)
ch 1, 2dc in sp between groups to form fourth side, ch 1, in next corner sp work (2dc, ch 1, 2dc), (5th corner)
ch 1, 2dc in sp between groups to form fifth side, ch 1, in next corner sp work (2dc, ch 1, 2dc), (6th corner)
ch 1, 2dc in sp between groups to form sixth side, ch 1, in next corner sp work (2dc, ch 1, 2dc), (7th corner)
ch 1, 2dc in sp between groups to form seventh side, ch 1, in next corner sp work (2dc, ch 1, 2dc), (8th corner)
ch 1, 2dc in sp between groups to form eighth side, ch 1, join with sl st to top of ch-2. Finish off.

 

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Crochet Cabana uses American crochet terminology.
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Copyright 1997 - 2016 by Sandra Petit. All rights reserved.

Crochet Cabana created October 1997 (domain name purchased March 2001)
Crochet Cabana’s Crafty Corral begun November 7, 2004.
The Crochet Cabana Blog begun May 2010.
Site update November 18, 2012.