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The Basics | Video Tutorial | Pattern

Working in the Round - Making a Hat
© 2005 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com

Now you know how to make a flat circle. There are many things you can do with a circle.  Two circles in worsted cotton with an added loop for hanging, can be put them together to form a nice thick  pot holder. A small circle can be a coaster. You  can use multiple strands or wide strips of cloth with a larger hook and make a  circular rug. A single cotton circle can be a dishcloth. You can use  crochet thread and  make doilies. You could also make a round pillow. What I personally enjoy making is hats so I thought I'd give you a bit of  basic info on making a simple hat. 

There are, of course, many different kinds of hats. This is just one very simple hat design, the basic circle and sides.

With the basic beginning I demonstrate in the tutorial on working in the round, you can make a lot of different hats. You can vary the type of stitches, use different colors to make stripes, use different yarn and hooks to get various sizes. A hat worked with chunky or worsted yarn will look much different than that worked with fingering yarn. By changing the coloring, adding stripes, adding different stitches for a round or two, using a different edging, you can take this basic design and give it just that little bit extra to make a more interesting design. Here are some examples.


For the hat on the left, I added a stripe in a different color and used both colors for an edging where I changed color every stitch. I have a video demonstrating the edging technique. On the right, I worked the beginnings of a simple hat, then alternated the basic design with a round where I skipped every other stitch, working (dc, ch 1, sk 1).
 


When making the blue hat, I added a round with a popcorn stitch. You could use a front post stitch, or a puff, or another kind of stitch to make a round pop. Extra rounds allowed me to turn up a few rounds on the orange one, creating a brim. The hat below  is the basic hat with just that little bit extra right at the end--a picot edging for a bit of feminine appeal.
 


Another option for finishing off your hat would be to add earflaps. Dave at Serendipity has patterns using this technique. These are the cutest hats--Dave calls them helmets.

If you go beyond the basics, you have even more of a variety. Here are some samples. (Pattern locations are noted.)
 


The hat above was created using the Ribbed Round Hat pattern by Sandra Huffines. It uses post stitches to get the look. Great pattern for a fez! Tip: for Rnds 5-18 you will be working fpdc in fpdc and bpdc in bpdc)
 


On the left is a wonderful pattern for a slouchie hat called Big Button Beret by the Gingerbread Lady, which was made using sock yarn. Yes, it took forever, but I adore the finished product. This is also where I first saw the option of using a (ch 1, dc) instead of a ch-3 as the chain up to get your rounds to height. I don't use that method in the tutorial because a beginner might find it difficult to tell which is the first stitch for ending the round, but I do use it in most of my personal projects. I am forever grateful to her for this little tidbit. Other than that bit, the beginnings of this beret are the same as the basic hat pattern, then branches into its own variation. (Did I say I love this hat?) On the right is the Bobble Beauty by Dot Matthews. Again, the hat starts off with the basics, then branches into Dot's variation.

The Basics

There are several things to consider in making a hat. The most important, of course, is the size of the head you're trying to fit. Also whether you want a more flat look on top with sides coming straight down, or if you want a more gradual decrease. Remember that in the tutorial our job was to keep the circle flat. If you are making a hat, at some point you will want your circle to "bow" to make the body of the hat.

To create the bow for the sides, you would simply stop increasing and work even until your hat fits the way you want it to. This will give you a flattish top with straightish sides. (That's technical enough, right?) I have used this method to design a toilet paper roll cover with this type of hat. You could also make a baby bunting by making more rounds and just continuing to go up the sides. To make a brim you turn up, just work even until it is as you want it. I like to work in FLO (front loop only) at the point I want my brim to fold. So many options.

If you prefer to have a more gradual slope, you have to decrease your increases. hee hee Instead of making 12 increases to make it lie flat, you would make 6 increases for a couple of rows for a gradual bow. (Thanks to Dave at Serendipity for that suggestion.) You have to pay attention, however, to which round you begin your 6 stitch increases or your hat will be way large and won't fit anybody's normal size head.

For example, I tried this with an H hook, following the tutorial to round 5, then increasing to 66 stitches on Round 6 and 72 on Round 7. The circumference of the finished hat was 23 3/4". From the sites I visited this seems to be an extra large size. To get it smaller, you could use a smaller hook or perhaps use sport yarn instead of worsted weight. OR you could start the 6-increase round sooner. That's what I did in the pattern below.

Note: Circumference is the distance around a circle (e.g. the outer rim of the hat). I measured this by placing a needle to mark my beginning point, and then using a flexible tape measure, I measured around the outer rim, being careful not to stretch the yarn.

Another way to get the circumference is to measure the diameter and multiply it by pi (3.14). So if the diameter of this circle would be 5". Then the circumference would be 5 x 3.14 = 15.7 (just over 15 1/2" ).

Practically, this is approximate. You can read more about circumference online here.

 

The Traveling Seam

When making a hat, particularly when using half double crochet, you might notice that the join or seam is visible and even seems to be moving a bit further on each round. It moves to the right if you’re right handed and to the left if you’re left handed. This has been called a traveling seam, a diagonal seam, a jogging seam, a traveling curve and probably other things as well. It’s a very common problem.

Here is a picture of a hat worked in half double crochet with a diagonal seam.

hat-hdc2

What can you do if you have a traveling seam and it bothers you? Between the Internet and my personal experience, here are a few things I think you can do to combat this problem. If the seam doesn’t bother you, don’t worry about it. The hat will be just as serviceable with a straight seam or a diagonal seam.

1) Finish off your round with an invisible join, then start the next round in a different place. This puts your increases in different spots and each seam is invisible so no traveling. Of course you have tails to weave in.

2) If you don’t want all those tails to sew in, one thing I have been doing for a while now with my dc hats is to join my round with a slip stitch, then work a (ch 1, dc) as my first stitch of that round, rather than working a chain 3. I then use that dc as my first stitch, bypassing the ch-1, which does not count as a stitch. It doesn’t make your seam totally invisible, but I think it gives a nice look and my dc seams are generally straight.

3) Work your hat in a spiral, not joining to the first stitch at all.

4) Turn every round if the piece you are working allows you to do that without sacrificing the look you want.

5) Work the chain-3 turning chain, but when you get back around to join, skip the chain 3 and join into the next double crochet. You then have to work an increase somewhere, usually the first stitch, to make up for skipping the ch-3. You do have to be careful that you are placing your stitches correctly and that you maintain the number of stitches you need to have on that round.

There are several YouTube videos which methods others have tried to combat this problem. Beth in Texas has a series of videos on this topic. Just search for crochet traveling seam or diagonal seam or straight seam and you will find several more.

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Video Tutorial

This 3-part series of videos demonstrates how to crochet a simple hat in one color. I use an H Inox hook and Loops and Threads Impeccable Yarn. If you want, go ahead and crochet along!
 


 


 


 

 

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Pattern

Here’s a basic hat pattern. This hat can be made with or without a gradual slope; it’s up to you. Extra information and details are in teal.
 

Basic Hat
© 2005, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com

Materials
I hook, needle for sewing in ends, worsted weight yarn (with a skein of Patons Canadiana, I can usually get at least 2 hats. I think the skeins are 3 or 3.5 ozs).

Size
See pics above.

Instructions
Use the adjustable ring or ch 5 and join with a slip stitch.

The first rounds will be your regular 12 stitch increase.

Round 1
ch 3 (counts as your first dc here and throughout) (note: as always, you can use ch-2 if this brings you to the proper height), work 11 more dc in ring (12 dc), join with a sl st to top of beg ch-3, If you used the adjustable strand, pull on your loose strand to close the center hole

Round 2
ch 3, dc in same stitch, 2 dc in ea stitch around (24 dc) (that's your 12 st increase to keep your circle flat), join with a sl st to top of beg ch-3

Round 3
ch 3, 2 dc in next st, (dc in next st, 2 dc in next st) around, (36 dc) (24 + 12 = 36. You're putting your increase in every other stitch), join with a sl st to top of beg ch-3

Round 4
ch 3, dc in next st, 2 dc in next st, (dc in ea of next 2 sts, 2 dc in next st) around (11 times), (48 dc) (36 + 12 = 48. Increase in every third st), join with a sl st to top of beg ch-3

Extra note: If you want a larger top, follow instructions here.
Extra note: If you want a straight side without the gradual slope, follow instructions here.

Here we start the gradual slope...


Round 5
ch 3, dc in ea of next 6 sts, 2 dc in next st, (dc in ea of next 7 sts, 2 dc in next st) around (5 times ) (note that your 7th stitch will be worked into the first dc of the previous increase and your new increase will be worked into the second dc of the previous increase) (54 sts) (48 + 6 = 54), join with a sl st to top of beg ch-3. Your circle will bow in just slightly. That's okay. That's what it is supposed to do.

Explanation: Previous round (round 4) had 48 sts. You want 6 increases, so 48 / 6 = 8. You need an increase every 8 sts. Your beg ch-3 counts as one, you dc in 6 and then work your increase in the 8th st. Then you can work your pattern, dc in 7 and 2 dc in the 8th.

Round 6
ch 3, dc in ea of next 7 sts, 2 dc in next st, (dc in ea of next 8 sts, 2 dc in next st) around (note that your 8th stitch will be worked into the first dc of the previous increase and your new increase will be worked into the second dc of the previous increase) (60 sts) (54 + 6 = 60), join with a sl st to top of beg ch-3

Explanation: Previous round (round 5) had 54 sts. You want 6 increases, so 54 / 6 = 9. You need an increase every 9 sts. Your beg ch-3 counts as one, you dc in 7 and then work your increase in the 9th st. Then you can work your pattern, dc in 8 and 2 dc in the 9th.

Now you've got the same number of stitches you had at the end of round 5 in the tutorial )60), but you've made the slope a little more gradual. By using this one method, you can adjust your size by changing hooks, and not have to worry about figuring out where to do your increases.


Rounds 7 - 11
ch 3, dc in ea st around, join with a sl st to top of beg ch-3.

Using a size I or 5.5 mm hook, the diameter of my circle to round 6 (when pushed flat) is about 6 1/2". I didn't measure the one I did with a G hook at that point. The hat (using the I hook) fit my head, just barely covering my ears. On a larger head it would probably come just above the ears. Circumference was 21.5"

If you need a longer hat, just add another row of dc. You can add a fancy edging or other stitches such as the fpdc as desired. If you want a rolled up brim, you can use single crochets for a few rounds. Four or five rows of sc will give you a nice snug brim.

For a larger top:

Round 5
ch 3, dc in each of next 2 stitches, 2 dc in next st, (dc in each of next 3 stitches, 2 dc in next st) around (60) (48 + 12 = 60), join with a sl st to top of beg ch-3

Round 6
ch 3, dc in ea of next 8 sts, 2 dc in next st, (dc in ea of next 9 sts, 2 dc in next st) around (66 sts) (60 + 6 = 66), join with a sl st to top of beg ch-3

Explanation: Previous round (round 6) had 60 sts. You want 6 increases, so 60 / 6 = 10. You need an increase every 10 sts. Your beg ch-3 counts as one, you dc in 8 and then work your increase in the 10th st. Then you can work your pattern, dc in 9 and 2 dc in the 10th.

Round 7
ch 3, dc in ea of next 9 sts, 2 dc in next st, (dc in ea of next 10 sts, 2 dc in next st) around (72 sts) (66 + 6 = 72., 66/6 = 11 so you increase in the 11th st), join with a sl st to top of beg ch-3

Rounds 8 - 12
ch 3, dc in ea st around, join with a sl st to top of beg ch-3

If you need a longer hat, just add another row of dc. You can add a fancy edging or other stitches such as the fpdc as desired. If you want a rolled up brim, you can use single crochets for a few rounds. Four or five rows of sc will give you a nice snug brim.

To make the hat with no gradual slope:

Round 5
ch 3, dc in each of next 2 stitches, 2 dc in next st, (dc in each of next 3 stitches, 2 dc in next st) around (60) (48 + 12 = 60), join with a sl st to top of beg ch-3

Rounds 6 - 12
ch 3, dc in ea st around (60)

If you need a longer hat, just add another row of dc. You can add a fancy edging or other stitches such as the fpdc as desired (see examples above). If you want a rolled up brim, you can use single crochets for a few rounds. Four or five rows of sc will give you a nice snug brim. If you want a brim that stands out as the picture of my great-niece, you would work 2 or 3 dc in each stitch for a round or two, then work even for a round. The number of stitches determines how ruffly a brim you would get.


Hope you enjoyed both the tutorial on working in the round and this information on making hats. As I said, there are tons of styles of hats out there. Go surf and find some! Have fun!

 

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Copyright 1997 - 2016 by Sandra Petit. All rights reserved.

Crochet Cabana created October 1997 (domain name purchased March 2001)
Crochet Cabana’s Crafty Corral begun November 7, 2004.
The Crochet Cabana Blog begun May 2010.
Site update November 18, 2012.