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Jump to:
Backwards Single Crochet | Berry stitch | Bobble | Bullion block | Cluster | Cross stitch | Diagonal box stitch | Herringbone half-double | Linked triple | Long stitches | Picot | Popcorn | Puff | Reverse Single Crochet | Spider stitch | Straight box stitch | V-stitch | X-stitch | Y-stitch

 

Backwards Single Crochet
update © 2010, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 

Alternate name(s): Inverse single crochet


This is NOT the reverse single crochet, but a different method of working the single crochet. It is not a simple stitch to make, but requires a bit of dexterity and patience to master. Using this method will give your work a front and back as the backwards row will look very close to the same as the first "front" row. Another method of getting a similar look is to use the left-handed method of crocheting back along the same row without turning.

Instructions:
1) With yarn held in front, insert hook from back of stitch, through both loops, out to front
2) Yarn over in opposite direction from that which you normally would, grab yarn and pull back through stitch (from front to back)


3) Two loops on hook
4) Yarn over, again in opposite direction you would normally go (and different from step 2), just slip hook under the yarn. There are two ways I saw to do this with success. You can sort of turn the hook upwards to grab the yarn securely, or you can angle the hook down and pull through.


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Berry Stitch
update © 2010, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 

Alternate name(s): Bead stitch
 


 

Instructions:
Insert hook in specified st, yo and pull through  (2 lps on hk); (yo, pull through one loop) 3 times for a ch-3 (2 lps on hk), YO, draw through both lps on hook.

 

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Bobble Stitch
update © 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 


The bobble is similar to both the puff and the cluster. Click here for a video on the difference. Remember, not everyone uses the same terminology, so check your patterns for special stitch instructions. All of these stitches can be made smaller or larger by following the procedure for more repeats.

Bobbles are joined at the top and the bottom. They are worked in the same stitch and on the wrong side of the work. (In other words, the bobble puffs out on the side opposite to that on which you are working.) If you want your bobbles on the same side of your work, you need a row of stitches between bobble rows.

The bobble can be worked with any other stitch. It will puff to the back and will show up clearly if surrounded by single crochets.
 

 

Instructions:
1) Yarn over, insert hook in stitch, yo and pull through, yo and pull through 2 loops on hook (2 loops remain on hook)
2) Yarn over, insert hook in the same st, yo and pull through, yo and pull through 2 loops on hook (3 loops remain on hook)
3) Yarn over, insert hook in same st, yo and pull through, yo and pull through 2 loops on hook (4 loops remain on hook)
4) Yarn over and draw through all 4 loops on hook. Some choose to ch 1 to close.

You can make the bobble larger by repeating steps 1 to 3 as many times as desired, then to complete stitch yo, pull through all loops (including the one on hook), work a chain to close it up at the top if desired.

Abbreviated instructions: Yarn over, insert hook in specified st, yo, pull through, yo, pull through two loops, (yo, insert hook in same st, yo, pull through, yo, pull through two loops) twice, yo, and pull through all loops on hook, ch 1 to close.

 

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Bullion Block Stitch
update © 2010, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 

Alternate name(s): Block stitch (see below)


In my experience the term "block stitch" has been used to refer to the stitch otherwise known as the diagonal box stitch, straight box stitch, crazy stitch or brick stitch. I have a tutorial on the diagonal box stitch and the straight box stitch. These are NOT the same as the stitch shown below. However, in the references I found to demonstrate this stitch, it was called Block Stitch. I didn't want this to be confused with what is known as Block Stitch today, so I thought I would call it something different. I considered Bullion Stitch Variation, but that just didn't work for me. Beth Ham suggested Bullion Block Stitch and that seemed right on, so that's what I'm calling it. That way if one searches for Block Stitch, perhaps it will still come up, and if you search for bullion you might learn a variation that you might find easier to work. Hope you enjoy it!

The Bullion Block Stitch is similar to two other stitches. It is similar to making a puff stitch in that you hold all your loops on the hook until you're ready to pull through. It also has some similarity, as noted, to the Bullion Stitch in that there are multiple "wraps" that you have to pull the hook through.  Unlike those stitches, you work the stitch around the post of a previously created stitch, it is worked using two stitches, and it is also not very puffy, but more flat.
 

 

Instructions:
Make a dc, * yo and insert hook to the right of the post of the dc just made. Go under the post, front to back, yo and pull through. Repeat  from * until you have as many wraps as you need. I make mine generally to 9 loops on hook which is 4 repeats. Then yo, insert hook in next stitch. yo and pull through all loops. At this point, you can choose to Ch 1 to close, make your next dc without chaining one, or if you are making a row of Bullion Block Stitches you could do as Margaret Hubert does in her square and insert hook in next st, yo and pull through, then work 2 chains, yo, and draw through loops. Then you would continue to work BBS around the chains just made. I think the reasoning behind the chains rather than making another dc is that it doesn't give you that extra loop on the side, so I am totally with her on that.

 

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Cluster
update © 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 

International symbol:


The cluster is similar to both the bobble and the puff. Click here for a video on the difference. Remember, not everyone uses the same terminology, so check your patterns for special stitch instructions. All of these stitches can be made smaller or larger by following the procedure for more repeats.

Clusters are joined at the top but not the bottom. They are worked over several stitches.
 

 

Instructions:
1) Yarn over, insert hook in next stitch, yo and pull through, yo and pull through 2 loops on hook (2 loops on hook)
2) Yarn over, insert hook in next st, yo and pull through, yo and pull through 2 loops on hook (3 loops on hook)
3) Yarn over, insert hook in next st, yo and pull through, yo and pull through 2 loops on hook (4 loops on hook)
4) Yarn over and draw through all 4 loops on hook.

Abbreviated instructions: *yo, insert hook in next st, yo, pull through, yo, pull though two loops, repeat from * twice, yo, and pull through all loops on hook

Clusters can be made of any size and used as a decrease in a pattern.

 

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Cross Stitch (front and back)
update © 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 

Alternate names:
X-stitch (note that there is also another stitch called the X-stitch, which is different)

International symbol:
 


This stitch is similar  to the V-Stitch I talk about in a separate tutorial, in that it is made with two  double crochets, but there is no ch-1 between them, and the stitches are  "crossed". It can also be made using triple crochets, or really any  other size stitch, as long as you pull the yarn up high enough so that your work  doesn't buckle down.

I usually use the front cross stitch, but you can also work a back cross stitch.
 

 

 

 

Instructions:
Assume you have made your foundation chain and perhaps a row of dc
Chain 2 (or 3, whichever you need to bring you to proper height) 

The first double crochet for your X-stitch will not be placed in the base of that chain you just made. Nor do you work it in the next stitch. You move over to the left into the NEXT stitch and work your double crochet. This is the first leg of the Front X-stitch.

To complete the front cross stitch, yo, place your hook in front of the stitch you just made and insert it in the stitch you skipped. Complete a double crochet. Voila! You've just made a front X-stitch.

To work the back cross stitch, I have seen two methods used. Here's how I do it.

Place your hook behind the stitch just made and insert it in the skipped stitch. Then continue to make a double crochet. It gives you a slightly different look. I find the back cross stitch a little more difficult maneuver. Being somewhat lazy, I usually opt for the easier front cross stitch, which I find looks quite nice.

To make the next cross stitch you will skip a stitch, work a dc in the next stitch, then go back and work either a front or back cross stitch in the skipped stitch. The picture below shows you once again where to place your stitch.

The other method is a little bit easier to do. You work the first leg the same as before. Then you place your hook in front of the stitch you just made, but insert it from the back to front of that skipped stitch, going through both loops. I will take a picture soon as I can and add it.

You choose the method you prefer.

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Diagonal Box Stitch
update © 2003, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 

Alternate name(s): Crazy stitch, crazy shell, block stitch, brick stitch
 


This is a common stitch, around since the late 1800's according to About.com. This stitch pattern produces a gorgeous, close-knit stitch that is perfect for a cold climate. By working it on the diagonal you can measure the sides and determine when you've gotten it to the width you want, without having to bother with figuring out a multiple etc. My intent here is to show you the procedure, which you can use to make whatever you want to make with it. If you are making a larger piece, you would work the increase rows to the width you want, then start at the decrease rows.
 

 

 

A note about colors: A little planning is advisable if you are working a pattern of stripes and you want your pattern to end evenly. If you are using the same color throughout, this is obviously not a problem.

You cannot make a square (equal number of rows wide and long) changing colors every 2 rows and have it come out even. You will end up with one square of one color at the end and this will be the opposite color from the one you began with. I tried it twice--once decreasing on an even row and once decreasing on an odd row. I was quite confused by this until I approached my mathematical husband who explained it all to me. Without even laughing. Don't ask me to do it. Please. LOL Take my word for it. However, you CAN work a rectangle and have it come out even, but you may end on the opposite color, or not, depending on how many rows you work.

If you are working two colors, changing every two rows, and carrying your yarn up the side, you will have a problem on the decrease row with the new color showing through the slip stitches. Originally I suggested slip stitching over in the old color and then making the change to your new color. However, I now realize if you are carrying your yarn, this will cause the yarn to cross your work. There are a few solutions to this though none are totally satisfactory.

One is working sc instead of sl st for your decrease. Sc OVER your new color strand so it doesn't show (at least not much) and then continue with the pattern as is. Here's what you do exactly. ch 1, turn, lay your new color in front of your first stitch, insert hook under the strand of your new color, yo with your old color, pull through, complete sc. Work a sc in each of the next 2 sts, working over your new color strand. Then, insert hook under ch-3, yo with NEW color, pull through, continue to complete sl st. ch 3, 3 dc with  new color and continue pattern. However, when you finish your two rows in that color, and you get to the end, you will again have to finagle the old and new yarn to hide it. This is not impossible to do, but it is not easy either. Since you are working diagonally, eventually the end of your row will make it too difficult to carry that yarn, so you will have to cut it anyway to change colors.

A second alternative is to make your decrease before your color change. In other words, work row 5 in your old color and decrease at row 6 still using the old color Then change colors on the increase, rather than the decrease. At some point you will be decreasing at both ends, so the problem will not disappear, but it will be delayed.

A third alternative is to cut your yarn (leaving at least 6" for sewing in later) and join with a slip stitch under the ch-3, completely skipping the slip stitches.

Instructions:
Row 1: Chain 6, double crochet in the 4th chain from hook, then dc in chains 5 and 6

Row 2 (Increase Row): Chain 6, dc in chains 4, 5 and 6, flip previous row up (Pull it towards the front in a flipping motion), * insert hook under the chain-3 of the previous "box", join with a sl st, ch 3, 3 dc in same space, repeat from * to end of row.

Note: Alternate method: Insert hook under the ch-3 of the row 1 "box", single crochet to join, ch 2, work 3 dc under ch-3 grouping

Repeat Row 2 to size then start decrease rows.

There are two procedures you can use for decreasing. Both assume you have joined to the previous box with a slip stitch.

Decrease Row:

Method 1: ch 3, turn (not flip - TURN just as you normally do in crochet, then *join with a sl st under ch-3 loop, ch 3, 3 dc in same space*, repeat from * to * to end of row to complete row.The ch-3 will just lie on the side of the box.

Method 2: ch 1, turn (not flip - TURN just as you normally do in crochet, sl st in next 3 dc, sl st under ch-3, ch- 3, 3 dc in same space. *join with a sl st under next ch-3 loop, ch 3, 3 dc in same space*, repeat from * to * to end of row to complete row.

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Crochet Cabana uses American crochet terminology.
For UK/Australia terms & international symbols, click here.

Copyright 1997 - 2016 by Sandra Petit. All rights reserved.

Crochet Cabana created October 1997 (domain name purchased March 2001)
Crochet Cabana’s Crafty Corral begun November 7, 2004.
The Crochet Cabana Blog begun May 2010.
Site update November 18, 2012.