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Jump to:
Backwards Single Crochet | Berry stitch | Bobble | Bullion block | Cluster | Cross stitch | Diagonal box stitch | Herringbone half-double | Linked triple | Long stitches | Picot | Popcorn | Puff | Reverse Single Crochet | Spider stitch | Straight box stitch | V-stitch | X-stitch | Y-stitch

 

Herringbone Half-Double
update © 2007, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 


 

Instructions:
1) Yarn over
2) Insert hook under top two loops of next stitch and yarn over
3) Pull through (3 loops on hook)
4) Do NOT yarn over again. Just pull through the first loop on hook (2 loops remain on hook)
5) Yarn over
6) Pull through both loops on hook.

Note: You can do steps 3 and 4 in one motion--yo and pull through st and first loop on hook, 2 loops remaining.

 

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Linked Triple Crochet
update © 2010, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 


There are a few options in working the linked stitches. The first option is right at the beginning. Just as when you work into a foundation chain for any other stitch, there are a few ways you can do this. You can work under the top loop only, under the top two loops, or into the back hump, which is actually the middle stitch. You can read more about these methods in the section on working into the foundation chain.

 

Instructions:
To create your first linked stitch, you will work over the chains. There are two ways to do this. If you need a particular number of stitches to work with, you need to know which method you are going to use because it makes a difference in the number of chains you need to make.

Insert hook into the second chain from hook -  yo, pull through (2 loops on hook). Insert hook into next chain, yo, pull through (3 loops on hk). Then:

Method 1: skip the next chain and insert hook into the fourth chain
OR
Method 2: insert hook into the third chain

Both methods work equally well and there is nothing wrong with either. Use whichever you prefer.

Using the four loops you have on the hook, make a triple crochet. (yo, pull through 2 lps) 3 times.

To create your second linked stitch, you will insert your hook under the 1st horizontal loop of your triple crochet, yo and pull through. Keeping that loop on the hook, insert hook under 2nd loop, yo and pull through (3 loops on hook). Insert hook in next chain, yo and pull through (4 loops on hook). Complete a triple crochet as normal, using the four loops on hook.

For the second row, if you want to do the skip a chain, you will chain 4. If you don't want to skip a chain, chain up 3. Then work into the chain just as you did at the beginning, inserting hook into the first stitch of the row (do not skip a stitch as you do with regular triple crochet).

 

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Long Stitches
update © 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 

Alternate name(s): Spike stitches


A long stitch can be single, double or other size, whatever your pattern calls for. It usually means that instead of placing your stitch next in the row along which you are working, you will go down one or more rows below and complete your stitch. It adds a bit of texture to your work. Here's how it works with the single and double.
 

 

 

Instructions - long single crochet:
Insert your hook on the row below the row you are working on, and work a single crochet, bringing your loop up to same height as previous stitches.
 

 

 

Instructions - long double crochet:
Yarn over, insert your hook on the row indicated, and work a double crochet as normal but bringing your loop up to same height as previous stitches.

This stitch is commonly used in mosaic crochet and will give a pretty accent to your work, especially if worked in a different color. For example, you might work a piece in white and use a different color for each row using long stitch. Since you are not going to be using every stitch, you will need to carefully plan your foundation chain.

 

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Picot
update © 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 


A picot is essentially a loop made with chain stitches which gives a decorate edge to your piece. It can be made with any number of chains, but the most common is ch-3.
 

 

 

I know of two methods of working a picot.

Instructions - method 1:
Chain 3, slip stitch in 3rd chain from hook.

Instructions - method 2:
Chain 3, insert your hook in the front loop of your sc, and also in the left side loop of your single crochet. That will give you 3 loops on your hook. Yarn over, and pull through all three loops.

I often use what I call a "faux picot". It is yet another manner of working a picot. I don’t know if this would be acknowledged as a picot by others, but it is the term I use. Deborah Burger, in her book Look, Learn and Create Crochet, suggests the terms petite shells, mini shells and single crochet V stitch. I like to use this picot as edging on hats, afghans, and scarves. Whatever you call it, it’s a nice decorative edging.

Instructions - faux picot:
Work (sc, ch 2, sc) in the same stitch.

This gives the same raised effect of the commonly used picot methods. You can change the look of this type of picot by adjusting the number of stitches skipped.

 

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Popcorn Stitch
update © 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 

International symbol:

 

 

 

 

 

Instructions:
1) Make 5 dc in one stitch or space.
2) Take the loop off your hook (be careful not to stretch the loop). Insert hook from front to back in the first of your 5dc shell.
3) Re-insert hook into loop of last dc (from which you removed it previously).
4) Draw that loop through the first dc. Chain 1 here to close or secure the stitch. This is the front side of your work.

A back popcorn would be worked the same, except you would re-insert the hook in the first stitch from back to front. That will put your popcorn on the same side if you are working popcorn rows one after the other.

 

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Puff Stitch
update © 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 


The puff is similar to both the bobble and the cluster. Click here for a video on the difference. Remember, not everyone uses the same terminology, so check your patterns for special stitch instructions. All of these stitches can be made smaller or larger by following the procedure for more repeats.

When creating the puff stitch, note that the "puff" part appears larger on the back side. In my opinion this looks like it should be the "right" side, so I usually try to think ahead and make sure my puffs are in the right order on that side, especially if I'm working a letter or design. To get them all on the same side, you need to work a plain stitch row between puff stitch rows.
 

 

 

Instructions:
1) Yarn over.
2) Insert hook in next stitch, yarn over.
3) Pull through and bring yarn up to height of rest of stitches (3 loops on hook).
4) Yarn over.
5) Insert hook in SAME stitch, yarn over.
6) Pull through and bring yarn up to height of rest of stitches (5 loops on hook).
7) Yarn over.
8) Insert hook once again into the SAME stitch, yarn over.
9) Pull through and bring yarn up to height of rest of stitches (7 loops on hook).

Here's where you can veer off. There  are a couple different ways to complete the puff.

Method 1: Yarn over, draw through 6 loops, yo, draw through remaining 2 loops. Puff Stitch complete.
Method 2: Yarn over, pull yarn  through ALL loops on hook. Puff stitch complete.

Note: If you want your puff to be larger repeat step 7-9 again for 9 loops on hook.

 

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Reverse Single Crochet
update © 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 

Alternate name(s):
Crab stitch, shrimp stitch, pie crust stitch, Italian edge, corded edge, knurl

International symbol:


This stitch is created by working a single crochet stitch from left to right, instead of right to left. I usually use it as a border when I just want a finished edge, but do not need anything fancy. It works well for projects intended for men because it's not frilly.
 

 

Instructions:
After completing a row of single crochet, do not turn the work around, chain one, *insert the hook into the next stitch to the right (not in the stitch you just completed, but the next one, draw up a loop. Here's how you do that - You just angle your hook down and grab that sucker and pull it through. yo as normal and pull through both loops on the hook. rep from * across row.

When you get to the corner, you can make more than one stitch if you want to, or if this is the only round you're going to do and you want a rounded edge, go ahead and put just one in there. It's up to you. Follow the same rules you'd follow for a regular single crochet as to working along the sides. If your rows are worked in single crochet, work one rsc in each row. If your rows are worked in double crochet, then work two in one row and so on. You can fudge if you need to in order to keep your work flat. The finished product is what matters.

Alternate instructions:
There is also a different way to get the same "corded edge" look that one gets using the reverse single crochet, while continuing work in your normal direction. Here's how to do it.

Insert hook in stitch, yo and draw  through, twist your hook in a clockwise direction (if you're right  handed), yo, pull through both loops on hook.

 

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Spider Stitch
update © 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 


There are many variations of the spider stitch. Generally speaking, you are working into a row of stitches, creating "spider legs" with a combination of stitches of different heights.

This video demonstrates how to make the spider stitch used in my Gemstone Spider Afghan (available at Ravelry). There are many ways to make this stitch. You can use different stitches, vary the number of each kind of stitch or alter it in other ways. This is just the way I am doing it for this project.

 

Instructions:
Here is an example of the way I do it.

Spider Stitch Row 1: 19 dc
Spider Stitch Row 2: dc in ea of next 4 dc, ch 4, (sk 1, tr) 4x, ch 4, sk 1, dc in each of last 5 dc, ch 2 or 3, turn (10 dc, 4 tr)
Spider Stitch Rows 3-5: dc in ea of next 4 dc, ch 4, sc in each of next 4 tr, ch 4, dc in each of last 5 dc, ch 2 or 3, turn (10 dc, 4 sc)
Spider Stitch Row 6: dc in ea of next 4 dc, ch 1, (tr in next sc, ch 1) 4x, dc in each of last 5 dc, ch 2 or 3, turn (10 dc, 4 tr)
Spider Stitch Row 7: dc in ea dc and ch-1 space across, ch 2 or 3, turn (19 dc)

The number of stitches before and after the "spider" can be whatever number you choose. Also, you can use fewer or more stitches and fewer or more rows as long as your work doesn't bunch up or ruffle. Experiment to find what works best for you.
 

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Straight Box Stitch
update © 2003, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 


This is a gorgeous, close-knit stitch I think you will really enjoy, especially if you live in a cold area.

 

 

Instructions:
Note: Both methods noted give you the same "box" look.

Row 1: Chain a multiple of 4 (the video uses a foundation chain of 20), work 3 double crochets in 4th chain from hook,  * skip 3 chains, (single crochet in next chain, chain 2, 3 double crochets in same stitch), repeat from * to last 4 chains, skip 3 chains, end 1 single crochet in last stitch (I have 12 "boxes" made) .

Alternate method for the repeat [pictured]: skip 3 chains, (slip stitch in next chain, ch 3 and 3 dc in same stitch).


Succeeding rows: Row 2: chain 2 or 3 (whatever brings you up to the right height), turn, 3 double crochet in space between last single crochet and box of previous row (pictured, if you prefer you can go INTO the single crochet), * insert hook in chain-3 space, work (single crochet, chain 2, 3 double crochets) in same space, repeat from * ending with 1 single crochet in top of chain 3, drop green (do not cut), pick up white.

Alternate method for repeat (pictured): insert hook in chain-3 space, work (slip stitch over chain-3 loop, chain 3, 3 double crochet) in same space

Rows 3-end: Repeat ROW 2.

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V-Stitch
update © 2003, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 

International symbol:


A V-Stitch is actually a group of stitches that looks like a "V" (an open triangle);
(dc, ch 1, dc) is a common example.
 

 

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X-Stitch
update © 2003, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 


 

Instructions:
1) Yarn over twice, insert hook in stitch, yo, draw through st
2) Yarn over, draw through 2 loops (3 loops on hook)
3) Yarn over, skip 2 sts (or whatever the pattern tells you to do), insert hk in next st
4) Yarn over, draw through (5 loops on hook),
5) (Yarn over, draw through 2 loops) 4 times (1 loop on hook)
6) Chain 2, yo, insert hook in 2 strand at the center of the "triangle", yo, draw through (3 loops on hook)
7) (Yarn over, draw through 2 loops) twice.

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Y-Stitch
update © 2003, 2012 Sandra Petit, http://www.crochetcabana.com
 

International symbol:


 

 

Instructions:
1) Yarn over twice, insert hook into top two loops of stitch (unless otherwise specified), yo, pull through stitch (4 lps on hk)
2) (Yarn over, pull through 2 lps) 3 times (triple crochet made)
3) Chain 2 or 3, yo, insert hook in center of triple crochet, yo and pull through
4) (Yarn over and pull through 2 loops) twice.

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Crochet Cabana uses American crochet terminology.
For UK/Australia terms & international symbols, click here.

Copyright 1997 - 2016 by Sandra Petit. All rights reserved.

Crochet Cabana created October 1997 (domain name purchased March 2001)
Crochet Cabana’s Crafty Corral begun November 7, 2004.
The Crochet Cabana Blog begun May 2010.
Site update November 18, 2012.